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20130422
20130422
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to the board of supervisors on board of supervisors file no. 130244 [health, business and tax regulations code - regulate and establish annual fees - cottage food operations] ordinance amending the health code, by adding section 452.1, to establish a procedure for regulating cottage food operations; amending the business and tax regulations code, by adding section 249.1a, to establish annual fees for cottage food operations; and making environmental findings. explanatory documents: bos file no. 130244 >> we have a presentation by richard lee dept. of public health. >> welcome >> i am not sure if you want to go through the document presented to staff last week or summarize. >> chair adams: summarize. >> this legalizes home kitchens were people can actually make food in their homes and sell retail to the general public which is totally different than what we are used to in environmental health. we actually have a lot of concerns about this regulation throughout the state; concern about the fact that people could make stuff at home which we don't have any control in terms , of how they are inspe
and affordable housing by the value of private investment and using the power of tax increment financing. the value of the public land and the targeted developer fees and helping us create this vision without resorting to overburdening our general fund or new taxes. when this terminal was originally built in the 1930s it was a growing project. i'm confident the growth san francisco will continue to grow with a new transit center and downtown district. i also want to give a great shot out to president obama, it was really his funds that helped us kick this off and pelosi and feinstein and boxer and their on going constant up to date support. at the state level, governor brown has been a very strong supporter and leaders of both houses, president stein house and president per ez have shown strong leadership. this check is much more symbolic of many many other checks that have come as a result of investor confidence in the city. i want to thank the labor for being part of all these projects and the business community for working closely with us and
't notify people. first of all businesses are paying taxes so why can't we get all businesses from the tax rolls; secondly there are lists available to every neighborhood in business so it baffles me as a person who teaches direct marketing to uc berkeley . but they can't figure this out or take any suggestions for that that is extremely frustrating and part of the other problem is that they are doing a lot of their work out of the city. so for example when they do notify ,they are doing this out of hayward, and you can imagine that they would certainly hear this from me and they do and they promised they wouldn't do it again but so far we haven't had any other notification. so with the retail that we do have in the northeast mission we wanted to survive along with our pdr zone and at our meeting in the northeast mission we had quite it group from polk street came to our meeting a few weeks ago
on a smaller tax base, and, arguably, less affluent communities. man: sewickley township is a rural farming community, however, herminie itself would be considered to be the downtown area of the township. it's the agways, the auto-parts store, the bank. it's your typical small-town village. man: people think that rural areas are pristine and perfect and everybody has a nice, simple life. that's, uh, not exactly the situation here. when you come into town in the summer, you know you're coming to herminie. woman: the aroma in 90-degree days... can sometimes just want to knock you over. woman: we have water. we have power, we have gas, but we have no sewage. i guess when they laid out the town years ago, it just all went into the pipes and straight into the "crick." sabljak: i've lived here 43 years in the same house. when i moved here, they told us that sewage would be here shortly. and here it is 43 years later and we still don't have it. my husband and i went to the first meeting. he always said, "boy, i'll never see it in my lifetime." well... my husband passed away last december. man: rig
are trusted employees of local businesses. those local businesses and those employees are returning tax dollars into the local economy. so when you're serving 50,000 people a year, when you're placing 2,000 people a year, that has a significant economic impact on our local communities. where do you see yourself in a year from now? what would you say, class? working.g. working. right. working. right. so, david, we're, we've talked a little bit about what are some of the challenges for people coming in. talk to us about what is working. what programs do you currently have that basically provide great opportunities for individuals who may have had a problem and, and are now in recovery? that's a great question. and the first thing we've discovered was that we didn't even know who had the problems before. so the first element is to do a much better assessment, screening, and to find out who has the problems. the second is, we have moved away from the continuum of approaches where you start out with treatment and you go to some education to having much more of an array of approaches. so a pe
tax dedicated to water and sewer infrastructure. hunter: that sales tax counts for about a third of the revenue of the department right now. franklin: we got 75% of the voters to agree to tax themselves so that their children and their children's children could have clean water because we're investing in it now. hunter: there were no alternatives. the infrastructure was in dire straits. a lot of people didn't want to believe it had to be done, but it had to be done. what came out of those lawsuits by the upper chattahoochee river keeper were two consent decrees, focused on overflows. the intent is, city of atlanta, you need to keep the flows in the pipe. narrator: with the help of the funding the city raised, atlanta has been implementing an asset management plan that evaluates and addresses their infrastructure issues. hunter: it's a continuum. at one end, you have your regular maintenance that you do every day on the system, and at the other end, long-term planning so that every year we're repairing, replacing the right things, and we don't have to do it all at once, which is,
clients are working poor. they pay their taxes. they may run into a rough patch now and then and what we're able to provide is a bridge towards getting them back on their feet. the center averages about 14,000 visits a year in the health clinic alone. one of the areas that we specialize in is family medicine, but the additional focus of that is is to provide care to women and children. women find out they're pregnant, we talk to them about the importance of getting good prenatal care which takes many visits. we initially will see them for their full physical to determine their base line health, and then enroll them in prenatal care which occurs over the next 9 months. group prenatal care is designed to give women the opportunity to bond during their pregnancy with other women that have similar due dates. our doctors here are family doctors. they are able to help these women deliver their babies at the hospital, at general hospital. we also have the wic program, which is a program that provides food vouchers for our families after they have their children, up to age 5 they are able to rec
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

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